Should I Change Knob & Tube Wiring Inside My Older Home?

Knob-and-tube wiring is available in homes from the early 1930’s and elderly. It gets its name in the fabric wrapped hot and neutral wires which traveling individually and utilizes white ceramic knobs and tubes to fasten to and pass through wood members at the home. You might observe knob & tube wiring from the attic or basement of your home, but more than likely, there’s loads of it buried in the walls, also.

Knob-and-tube wiring is usually considered acceptable for a home if it is in good shape, does not have newer wiring spliced on it to supply extra sockets, and isn’t buried in insulation. But, it is uncommon to see knob-and-tube wiring which meets these three requirements. Homeowners hoping to better insulate and light their homes have usually murdered the old wiring or tried to expand it with extra outlets.

Security is something to think about with knob-and-tube wiring. You might have noticed a lot of the sockets in elderly homes just have two slots. The next hole was inserted to sockets for grounding, or preventing equipment by presenting a shock hazard. That floor wire is lacking from knob-and-tube wiring, making appropriate updating impossible without installing a new cable.

Another factor when contemplating replacing your knob-and-tube wiring would be the price of fire insurance for your home. Insurance companies typically charge more if your home is known to possess knob-and-tube wiring, since there’s an increased risk of fire associated with older wiring.

The easy solution to upgrading your knob-and-tube wiring would be: yes. Speak to a professional when you have queries or questions about the procedure and what is required to get your home’s electric wiring current.